Newcastle Permanent chair Michael Slater is set to step down from the role, but will remain on the board, among others.

Holding them to account: Outgoing Newcastle Permanent chair Michael Slater.

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The Newcastle Permanent’s annual general meeting will be your last as chair after nearly 10 years in the role. Why step down?

I have had a rewarding time as Chairman with many memories but it is the right time to let someone else step into the role of chair to facilitate board renewal and a refreshed perspective.The board renewal process has seen four directors out of the seven appointed over the last four years.This will provide an opportunity for newer directors to step up.

What are key achievements as chair?

I’m proud of the role of the board and chair in governing this organization through difficult periods over the last 10 years such that it continues to provide a superior, and I think fairer, proposition to the major banks:we have more satisfied customers, better value banking services, happier staff and a wide range of community support focused on young people and their families across regional NSW.

Success against the major banks has been the greatest achievement with more specifically the development of governance improvements and a more diverse board composition, including a better representative proportion of women directors.

Perhaps one of the more difficult achievements, which might sound like the easiest, is maintaining organisational formation around the strategic plan. So many organisations waste time and resources flip-flopping from one strategic initiative to another or chasing immaterial objectives that are not mission critical.Newcastle Permanent has pursued its strategic goals and executed them brilliantly over many years which enable us to take the fight to the major banks.

You have been chair of RDA Hunterfor a year. What progression have you seen?

Transition to new smart industries within the restructuring of the economy (ie innovation and infrastructure investment). Infrastructure development (defence, education, smart systems development and STEM training in schools). Working with regional stakeholders to achieve targeted projects in the regional strategic plan.

You are director of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service, which holds a place in the hearts of many Novocastrians. Why is that role important to you?

I’m extremely lucky that my professional skills and experience have given me the opportunity to work with some truly inspirational not-for-profit organisations.

For the WRHS here in the Hunter, it has been wonderful to be involved and support the organisation over the past 20 years. WRHS is a true community benefit not-for-profit – there is no charge for the service provided. From 1 January 2017 it is one of only two contracted rotary winged aeromedical retrieval services.It covers from Sydney to the QLD border.

Equally important, I’ve been very fortunate over the last 10 years as Chair of the Newcastle Permanent Charitable Foundation to meet and interact with volunteers from many charitable organisations that give unstintingly of their time and resources to the benefit of sections of the community that do not have the advantages the rest of us have.

After completing a bachelor of commerce at University of Newcastle, what were your plans?

My initial degree was with a major in Economics. I subsequently realised a need to study accounting at a degree level for my role as an accountant. Subsequently I attained an MBA.

What was your first post graduate job?

As a finance analyst, then chief accountant.

What do you hope you’ve instilled in staff?

Hire the right people, get the governance structure right, develop an effective strategic plan and focus on delivering it – without getting distracted on lesser issues.I also encourage people to keep ‘looking up’ – our main competitors are the major banks.

Is the region at a turning point insofar as recent State Government funding grants and the ongoing revitalization of the city?

The Hunter has experienced highs and lows over the last three to four decades, challenges that it has addressed by its resilience and the quality of its business leadership. We will always need to compete with the greater Sydney-centric perspective to continue to obtain grants on an ongoing basis. What is important is that if we do this on a project by project basis with a clear business case and integrated “regional” based focus.

You were named Business Leader of the Year at the 2016 Hunter Business Awards. What qualities do you admire in a leader?

Business leaders need to have a commitment to continue to “strive”, not give in or settle for “average”, or fail to take on a challenge.

I believe all business leaders, whether they operate a small enterprise or govern a large organisation, have an obligation to represent the interests of the community and give back to it in any capacity they can.

Michael Slater

Something very few people know about you?

I have received recognition for 50 years’ service with Surf Life Saving Australia.

Flashback: Melbourne Cup in the Hunterphotos

Flashback: Melbourne Cup in the Hunter | photos Melbourne Cup at The Windsor Castle Hotel. Photo: Perry Duffin.

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Melbourne Cup at The Windsor Castle Hotel. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at The Windsor Castle Hotel. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at The Windsor Castle Hotel. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at The Windsor Castle Hotel. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at The Windsor Castle Hotel. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at The Windsor Castle Hotel. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at The Windsor Castle Hotel. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at The Windsor Castle Hotel. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Club Maitland City. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at The Windsor Castle Hotel. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at The Windsor Castle Hotel. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at The Windsor Castle Hotel. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at East Maitland Bowling Club. Photo: Perry Duffin.

PRD nationwide Maitland.

PRD nationwide Maitland.

PRD nationwide Maitland.

PRD nationwide Maitland.

Club Maitland City. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Club Maitland City. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Club Maitland City. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Club Maitland City. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Club Maitland City. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Club Maitland City. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Club Maitland City. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Club Maitland City. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Club Maitland City. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Club Maitland City. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Club Maitland City. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Club Maitland City. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Club Maitland City. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Club Maitland City. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at the Belmore. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at the Belmore. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at the Belmore. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at the Belmore. Photo: Perry Duffin.

Melbourne Cup at the Belmore. Photo: Perry Duffin.

TweetFacebook The Hunter celebrates Melbourne CupPictures: Perry Duffin, Jonathan Carroll, Darren Pateman, Eddie Jim, Max Mason-Hubers, Peter Stoop, Dean Osland and Simone De Peak.As we prepare for the 2016 Melbourne Cup, take a look back at how the annual race day has been celebrated in the past.

No Makeup Nofember in Newcastle, along with no bras and hairy underarms

No makeup, no bra and hairy underarms | photos, poll Alicia Keys.

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Cameron Diaz.

Lady Gaga and cake.

TweetFacebookAlex Morris, 29, is giving $5 a photo to the charity One Girl for the first 100 photos she receives from females who are makeup free, ornot wearing a bra, or whohave hairy underarms.

She’ll also accept photos from men wearing makeup.

She has 64 photos so far, but she’s aiming for 120 in total.The photos have been posted on her Facebook page,No Makeup Nofember.

“It’s about shaking up the status quo and celebrating doing things a little bit differently,” said Alex, who livesin Newcastle.

The concept was based around challenging cultural norms, feminism and gender expectations.

“Ultimately it’s about raising money for a good cause. That’s the number one thing,” she said.

The One Girl charity works to keep girls in school in Africa.

Alex said she was not anti-makeup.

“It’s more about embracing the idea that men should be able to wear makeup without peoplebatting an eyelash and it’s OK if women don’t want to wear it,” she said.

Alex was inspired by the #NoMakeUp selfies of singer Alicia Keys on Instagram.

“In most of her photos on Instagram, she’s embracing the natural look–which is exciting,” she said.

The 35-year-old singer and 15-time Grammy winner published an essay in May, saying she no longer wanted to feel compelled to wear makeup.

“I don’t want to cover up anymore. Not my face, not my mind, not my soul, not my thoughts, not my dreams, not my struggles, not my emotional growth. Nothing,” she wrote.

She said on the US Today showthat “society puts limitations on us”.

“And in a lot of ways, I’m sick of it.It would be so amazing to just embrace each other how we are. I think the most important thing is, you do what feels good for you.”

Her comments started a #NoMakeUp movement online. Actress Cameron Diaz posted a picture of herself with no makeup, saying: “I want to talk about one of the biggest taboos in our society. Ageing. I feel like ageing has gotten a bad rap”.

“Learning that you can age well, will actually help you to age better. If you understand how your body works then you can take action to help keep it in the best possible condition, so it can carry you through a long and beautiful life.”

Send your pictures [email protected]杭州m.

Jones happy to back department of youth

IN THE DEEP END: Jets young gun Lachlan Jackson launches himself into the pool at The Forum. Picture: Simone De Peak JETS coach Mark Jones will continue to back youth.

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Jones worked extensively in youth development before stepping into senior coachingroles. He, more than most, knows the importance of giving players a chance.

So when the first-year head coach lost 100 plus-game veterandefenders Daniel Mullen and Jason Hoffman to injury, he had no hesitation in pitching rookies Lachy Jackson and Ivan Vujica into the fire.

It proved a masterstoke. The pair, combining on the left channel, were rock solid in the 4-0 triumph over Brisbane Roar on Sunday.

“You have to do the right thing and give the boys a chance,” Jones said.“If they don’t get a chance, then they don’t see light at the end of the tunnel and they don’t want to play for you. I will give them a chance every day of the week.”

Jackson, 21,had started12 A-League games before Sunday. It was 19-year-old Vujica’s second game and first start.

Add right back Nick Cowburn (21 and 34 games), midfielder Steve Ugarkovic (22 and 13 games), keeper Jack Duncan (23 and 10 games) and attacking midfielder Devante Clut (21 and 18 games) and there is real freshness about the squad.

Jets captain Nigel Boogaard, who played alongside Jackson in the heart of defence, was full of praise for the youngsters.

“Creditto them, they did really well and will make it hard for the others to get their spots back,” he said.“Our coach is willing to give youth a go, and there is enough experience on the field to help them through games. Both boys stood up and did their job. They will have their ups and downs.That is always the possibility with young players. As of tomorrow we concentrate for the weekend. It is the second game of the season …things can change very quickly.”

Hoffman (calf) is in the frame to return against Western Sydney Wanderers at Spotless Stadium on Sunday.

But with Mullen sidelined for at least two months, Jackson appears set for an extended run at left stopper.

“This next period is key for him,” Boogaard said.“It is a good opportunity for himto cement a spot andshow people he deserves to be playing at this level. I believe he has the potential to go a lot further than the A-League. Hehas a big future but he has to really take his opportunity and grasp it, and really want it.”

The Jets lost all three encounters to Western Sydney last season. The grand-finalist havesince turned over a number of personnel and have a new home at Spotless Stadium.

“It will be a good challenge for us,” Boogaard said. “They are definitely a different opponent to last year.”

Qantas opens new international business lounge at Brisbane Airport

A new lounge at Brisbane International Airport is the first of several new facilities Qantas aim to open in the coming months.

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The new multi-million dollar upgrade gives travellers a stylish and modern place to relax before their overseas flight, Qantas International CEO Gareth Evans said.

“It reflects the natural beauty of the Queensland landscape through natural light, furniture and design, offering a new standard in premium travel from Queensland’s capital”.

The lounge interior, 30 per cent more spacious than the previous layout, will also feature a special glass-and-light installation created by Brisbane artist Jenna Lee, which represents Queensland as viewed from above, brought to life through glass, watercolour and lights.

Based on the award-winning concepts of Hong Kong and Singapore, menus will also be inspired by the local region. Neil Perry will be working with local food producers to design seasonal menus.

New concepts include a breakfast buffet window from which chefs will serve Rockpool-designed dishes, including healthy breakfast bowls, bircher muesli and French toast.

Rehydration spot ‘Quench’ will serve a range of non-alcoholic beverages including syrups from Bickfords and Buderim Ginger as well as a signature tisane blend designed by Rockpool. A bar will serve craft beer and premium wine, and all-day barista coffee by Vittoria.

The lounge also features a business centre, Wi-Fi, TVs with Foxtel, shower suites with ASPAR by Aurora skincare products and a Sofitel service experience.

Queensland is an important hub for Qantas, with 60 direct international flights departing Brisbane per week.

A new domestic lounge, Business lounge and refreshed Qantas club – including a new Valet experience – is slated for early next year.

The latest improvement to Brisbane Airport comes after rival Virgin Australia, with Sir Richard Branson, opened a new domestic lounge there last year.

See also: Downgraded: How business class flyers can get bumped to economy

See also: Qantas resumes direct flights to Beijing